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School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences - The University of Texas at Dallas

Christine Dollaghan

 

Christine Dollaghan

Professor

PhD, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Child Language Development and Disorders

 

CD A 1.11

214-905-3063 phone

dollaghan@utdallas.edu email

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About Christine Dollaghan

 

Chris Dollaghan completed her BA in linguistics at Wesleyan University (Middletown, CT) and her MA and PhD in communicative disorders at the University of Montana and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, respectively. She was a professor at the University of Pittsburgh prior to joining the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences in 2006. She received the Honors of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) in 2012.

 

Research Interests

 

Dr. Dollaghan studies the nature, identification and outcomes of language and other communication disorders in young children, including children with specific language impairment and children recovering from traumatic brain injury. Her interests also include evidence-based practice and clinical decision-making. Current work focuses on the potential of non-invasive, non-volitional methods for quantifying language processing demands and learning rates in difficult-to-test groups, including young children.

 

Recent Publications

 

Dollaghan, C. (2013). Late Talker as a clinical category. In L. A. Rescorla and P. S. Dale (eds.), Late Talkers: Language development, intervention, and outcomes, pp. 91-112. Baltimore: Brookes.

 

Xuan, L. & Dollaghan, C. (2013). Language-specific noun bias: evidence from bilingual children. Journal of Child Language, 40, 1057-1075.

 

Campbell, T. F., Dollaghan, C., Janosky, J., Rusiewicz, H. L, Small, S. L., Dick, F., Vick, J., & Adelson, P. D. (2013). Consonant accuracy after severe pediatric traumatic brain injury: A prospective cohort study. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 56, 1023-1034.

 

Mueller, J. A. & Dollaghan, C. (2013). A systematic review of assessments for identifying executive function impairment in adults with acquired brain injury. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 56, 1051-1064.

 

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