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School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences - The University of Texas at Dallas

Chandramallika Basak

 

Chandramallika Basak

Assistant Professor

PhD, Syracuse University

Cognitive Aging and Plasticity

 

972-883-3724 phone

cbasak@utdallas.edu email

 

Lifespan Neuroscience and Cognition Laboratory website

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About Chandramallika Basak

 

Dr. Basak's research focuses on how and where in the brain we remember information over a short period of time; the interplay between attention and memory; and the effects of cognitive training, including video games and memory exercises, on the brain and cognition in both young and old adults. She is also investigating the effects of cardiorespiratory fitness on cognition.

 

Her honors include an Early Career Research Award at the 2007 Cognitive Ageing Conference in Australia, an Outstanding Dissertation Award and Outstanding Teaching Assistant Award from Syracuse University, and a Syracuse University Graduate Fellowship.

 

Dr. Basak earned a BS in mathematics and MS in psychology from University of Calcutta, India, as well as an MS degree in applied statistics, and an MS and PhD in experimental psychology from Syracuse University. Prior to moving to the Center for Vital Longevity in 2011, she was an assistant professor of psychology at Rice University. She also was a Beckman Institute Fellow and Research Scientist at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

 

Recent Publications

 

Voss, M.W., Prakash, R.P., Erickson, K.I., Boot, W.R., Basak, C., Neider, M., Simons, D., Fabiani, M., Gratton, G., & Kramer, A.F. (2012). Effects of training strategies implemented in a complex videogame on functional connectivity of attentional networks. Neuroimage, 59, 138-148. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2011.03.052

 

Scalf, P., Basak, C., & Beck, D. (2011). Attention does more than modulate suppressive interactions: Attending to multiple items. Experimental Brain Research, 212, 293-304.

 

Basak, C., and Verhaeghen, P. (2011). Aging and switching the focus of attention in working memory: age differences in item availability but not in item accessibility. Journal of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences, 66B, 519-526. doi: 10.1093/geronb/gbr028

 

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