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School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences - The University of Texas at Dallas

Jackie Nelson

 

Jackie Nelson

Assistant Professor

PhD, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Parenting, Family Stress, Emotional Processes within the Family System; Children's Emotional Development

 

GR 4.822

972-883-4478 phone

Jackie.Nelson@utdallas.edu email

 

Family Research Lab website

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About Jackie Nelson

 

Jackie Nelson earned her bachelor's degree in Psychology at Elon University and her doctoral degree in Human Development and Family Studies at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. She is an assistant professor of Psychological Sciences studying parenting, family interaction, family stress and children's social-emotional development.

 

Research Interests

 

Family members live in a system where they are constantly influenced by one another and by the environment. Emotion is a large part of family life and is especially likely to be transferred between parents and children. I am interested in many family processes including how mothers and fathers influence their spouse's parenting behavior, how stress occurring in parents' multiple roles affects family interaction, and how parents interact with their children and socialize their children's emotional development.

 

Recent Publications

 

Nelson, J. A., O'Brien, M., Grimm, K. J., & Leerkes, E. M. (in press). Identifying mother-child interaction styles using a person-centered approach. Social Development.

 

Nelson, J. A., Leerkes, E. M., O'Brien, M., Calkins, S. D., & Marcovitch, S. (2012). African American and European American mothers' beliefs about negative emotions and emotion socialization practices. Parenting: Science and Practice, 12, 22-41.

 

Nelson, J. A., O'Brien, M., Blankson, A. N., Calkins, S. D., & Keane, S. P. (2009). Family stress and parental responses to children's negative emotions: Tests of the spillover, crossover, and compensatory hypotheses. Journal of Family Psychology, 23, 671-679.