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The University of Texas at Dallas School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences

MEDIA HIGHLIGHTS

Media Highlights includes current, general interest media coverage of BBS students, faculty, staff and leadership and their achievements. Archives of previous articles back to 2015 are also available.


India New England News

Covid-19 Creates Hearing, Balance Disorders, Worsens Tinnitus: Study

Jun 11, 2021

“The factors that may play a role in the relationship between Covid-19 and hearing are multifold. Covid-19 is known to have inflammatory effects, including in neurological tissue, which can exacerbate other problems.” — Dr. Colleen Le Prell, the Emilie and Phil Schepps Professor of Hearing Science and professor and head of the Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing.


Hudson Valley 360

May is National Better Hearing Month

May 10, 2021

“Individuals with even mild hearing loss are at three times more risk of experiencing a fall and falls are the leading cause of fatalities in Americans over 65.” Dr. Angela Shoup, professor at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences and Executive Director, Callier Center for Communication Disorders.


NPR

For Seniors Looking To Stay Sharp in the Pandemic, Try a Game of Spades

Apr 17, 2021

“While moving in with children isn’t an option for all seniors, incorporating routines that are both fun and challenging keep the mind exercised and sharp — at least until more families are fully vaccinated and those affectionate embraces called hugs are in greater supply.” Dr. Denise C. Park, Distinguished University Chair in Behavioral and Brain Sciences and director of research at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences’ Center for Vital Longevity.


The Hearing Journal

Smartphone Technology: The Hub of a Basic Wireless Accessibility Plan

Apr, 2021

The combined efforts of two University of Texas at Dallas Research Labs, Hearing Health Lab and the Statistical Signal Processing Research Laboratory, resulted in an open-source research platform for speech processing and hearing improvement funded by The National Institute of the Deafness and Other Communication Disorders of the National Institutes of Health. — Dr. Linda Thibodeau, professor at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences.


The Bump

We Don’t Need Autism Awareness—We Need Autism Acceptance, Study Says

Mar, 2021

“It’s not easy to be autistic in a predominantly non-autistic world, and making the social world a bit more accommodating and welcoming to autistic differences could go a long way toward improving personal and professional outcomes for autistic people.” — Dr. Noah Sasson, associate professor at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences


NBC DFW

Experts Look Into Correlation Between COVID-19 and Tinnitus

Mar 26, 2021

“We do know for people who experience tinnitus, many of them won’t be bothered with their tinnitus at all and typically they’re more bothered by it if they’re under a lot of stress or if they’re having issues with sleep. Maybe they’re sleep deprived or fatigued or very anxious.” — Dr. Angela Shoup, professor at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences and Executive Director, Callier Center for Communication Disorders.


CBS DFW

Texas Roadhouse CEO Kent Taylor’s Death Raises Awareness About Potential Long-Term Effects Of COVID-19

Mar 22, 2021

“It is rare, but that can happen, where the symptoms of tinnitus become so unmanageable, that people take extreme measures.” — Dr. Edward Lobarinas, associate professor at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences.


PublicationName

A 25-Minute Training Can Help Reduce People’s Autism Biases

Mar 16, 2021

“The majority of interventions to improve autistic social experiences focus on asking autistic people to change who they are, just so others will accept them.” — Desiree Jones, PhD student in the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences.


Popular Science

Old Dogs Need to Learn New Tricks. Here’s Why.

Mar 9, 2021

“Anything that’s novel drives your brain to pay attention.At the cellular level, it spurs new expression, new signaling. That’s really good for you.” Dr. Kristen Kennedy, associate professor at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences.


The Washington Post

What Really Works to Help an Aging Brain. It’s Not Going to Function Like it Did in Your 20s, but There Are Things You Can Do.

Mar 7, 2021

“Requiring an extra moment or two to remember someone’s name or having a little trouble keeping a lot of information in your head at one time or switching between focused tasks are normal parts of aging and not a sign that you’re losing your mind. These changes are not threatening to your everyday life, as a general rule.” — Dr. Denise C. Park, Distinguished University Chair in Behavioral and Brain Sciences and director of research at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences’ Center for Vital Longevity.


VOA News

COVID-19 Exposes Hearing Problems

Mar 3, 2021

“A lot of people who may not have identified with hearing difficulties previously, possibly because they had a very minimal problem are recognizing increased communication difficulties now. Masks take away visual cues and “tend to distort and soften the speech signal.” — Dr. Angela Shoup, professor at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences and Executive Director, Callier Center for Communication Disorders.


UT Dallas Magazine

Psychology of Prejudice Class Navigates Conflict-Filled Year

Feb 22, 2021

“Everyone has the opportunity to share how racism and prejudice have impacted their lives as well as discuss current events. Bringing together students from many backgrounds, we were able to learn about each other’s personal experiences.” — Dr. Salena Brody, professor of instruction in psychology at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences.


NY Metro Parents

Study Finds Understanding of Autism Can Boost Social Inclusion

Feb 22, 2021

“Research on race suggests that people who have racial biases tend to view that race as a monolith, assigning every member the same features. By exposing them to different people from the group, you can challenge those stereotypes. We believe the same principle applies to autism.” — Desiree Jones, PhD student in the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences.


EurekAlert

Center for BrainHealth Researchers Create Virtual Reality Cognitive Assessment

Feb 5, 2021

“This study indicates that our strategies have a dramatic effect on our capacity. If you enter into a task prepared with a plan, you will get the most out of your brain and see much better performance.” — Dr. Daniel Krawczyk, Debbie and Jim Francis Chair and professor of cognitive neuroscience and cognitive psychology at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences’ Center for BrainHealth.


UT Dallas Magazine

UTD Trio Named Among 1,000 Inspiring Black Scientists

Feb 1, 2021

“It was always clear that there are very few people that look like me in the lab and conference rooms. This filled me with trepidation that I would not be understood. However, diversity is at the root of advancement and cutting-edge research.” — Dr. Michael Burton, assistant professor at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences.


UT Dallas Magazine

Study: Waterproof Phone Cases Not Sound-Problem Proof

Jan 19, 2021

“Those with hearing loss might need to make choices. Perhaps a person would only use a waterproof case when going fishing or might resort to texting when using a waterproof case. It’s important that they know the potential problem and plan ahead.” — Dr. Linda Thibodeau, professor at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences.


Tech Xplore

Study Outlines What Creates Racial Bias in Facial Recognition Technology

Dec 7, 2020

“Our discussion of image difficulty for racial bias is a relatively new topic. We show that as pairs of images become more difficult to distinguish — as quality is reduced — racial bias becomes more pronounced. That hasn’t been shown before.” — Dr. Alice O’Toole, Aage and Margareta Møller Professor and professor of neuroscience.


Center for BrainHealth

Protecting Your Brain Health During the Pandemic

Nov, 2020

“For everything you do, ask, What is this adding to my life? Are you doing crosswords just to pass the time and not be alone? Or are you doing different kinds of activities to stretch your mind and add meaning and purpose?” — Dr. Sandra Bond Chapman, Dee Wyly Distinguished University Chair and professor and founder and chief director at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences’ Center for BrainHealth.


Dallas News

Crystal Charity Ball Brings Hope to Thousands of Children Across Dallas County

Nov 30, 2020

The 2020 Crystal Charity Ball helped fund the Foundation for Callier Center for Communication Disorders with $997,996 in donations.


WTOV 9 Fox

Can You Repeat That? Hearing Trouble More Obvious with Masks

Nov 24, 2020

“More than likely, these are people that had some kind of hearing loss prior to all this starting but they were adapting.” — Dr. Andrea Gohmert, clinical assistant professor at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences.


Scientific American

What We Know So Far About How COVID Affects the Nervous System

Oct 22, 2020

“We know that if sensory neurons get infected with a virus, it can have long-term consequences, even if the virus does not stay in cells.”— Dr. Theodore Price, professor of neuroscience at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences.


Psychology Today

Why Gray Matter Volume and White Matter Connectivity Matter

Sep 26, 2020

“Evolving research on white matter shows that its ability to propagate signals strongly affects cognition and higher-order processing.” — Dr. Kristen Kennedy, associate professor at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences.


Signal

The Accuracy of Machines in Facial Recognition

Sep 9, 2020

“An algorithm developed in 2015 tested at the level of the students. One from 2016 performed at the level of fingerprint examiners, and one from 2017 was really close to the base specialists, the super recognizers. The most recent algorithm we have available was definitely at the level of the best humans.” — Dr. Alice O’Toole, Aage and Margareta Møller Professor and professor of neuroscience.


Dallas News

UT Dallas Biotech Startup Pursuing Non-Opioid Pain Therapy Sells to California Firm for $52.5 Million

Aug 25, 2020

The University of Texas at Dallas biotech startup CerSci Therapeutics has been bought by a San Diego pharmaceuticals company for $52.5 million in a deal that could later reward its backers with hundreds of millions more.


Fox 4 KDFW

Latest Issue of D Magazine Recognizes COVID-19 Heroes in North Texas

Aug 6, 2020

The article honors a few local doctors, nurses, bio-engineers, volunteers, attorneys and other workers who have gone above and beyond in the fight against COVID-19, including Dr. Robert Rennaker, a professor in the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences.


Multiple Sclerosis News Today

UT Doctoral Student Wins NIH Fellowship to Study MS Cognitive Changes

Aug 4, 2020

“If I can help even in an incremental way to get us closer to understanding how memory dysfunction occurs in MS, then I’m super interested in doing so.” — Mark Zuppichini, PhD candidate in the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences.


Medical Xpress

Researchers Examine Age Differences in How the Brain Perceives, Remembers

Jul 23, 2020

“This study specifically examined regions specialized for the processing of faces or visual scenes. This division of responsibilities is what we call differentiation.” — Dr. Michael Rugg, professor, and Director, Center for Vital Longevity.


WFAA 8

Fort Worth Priest Reflects on How COVID-19 Diagnosis Impacted Him

Jul 20, 2020

Rev. Dr. Robert Pace was Tarrant County’s first confirmed COVID-19 case. WFAA interviewed him and Dr. Theodore Price, professor of neuroscience at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences.


Community Impact Newspaper

UT Dallas scientists caution against potential long-term neurological effects of COVID-19

Jul 16, 2020

“Given how extraordinarily widespread this disease has now become in the United States, I’m, frankly, pretty terrified that we’re going to have people that have really long-lasting medical problems in numbers that we may not be able to deal with” — Dr. Theodore Price, professor of neuroscience at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences.


The Hearing Journal

Humanitarian Outreach Amid COVID-19

Jul, 2020

“Perhaps the most difficult reality for many who serve in an outreach capacity is the knowledge that the few humanitarian services offered in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are likely the only available services for many communities.” — Jackie Clark, clinical professor at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences and past president of the American Academy of Audiology.


Prevention

Why Are My Ears Ringing? 9 Causes of Tinnitus, According to Audiologists

May 28, 2020

“As an auditory phenomenon, tinnitus has quite the range. It could sound like crickets chirping, cicadas buzzing, high-pitched squeals, low-pitched hums, or even multiple pitches simultaneously.” — Jackie Clark, clinical professor at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences and past president of the American Academy of Audiology.


Fox 4

UT Dallas Professor Holds Shoe Box Graduation Ceremony for Seniors

May 19, 2020

College graduates from a UT Dallas psychology class got a home-spun ceremony courtesy of their professor. — Salena Brody, senior lecturer at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences.


Dallas innovates

UTD PhD Students Had the Largest Number of Dissertations This Semester—And Presented Them Online

May 4, 2020

Many universities in the U.S. postponed dissertation defenses in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. But UT Dallas says that was never an option.


UT Dallas Magazine

Coping with COVID-19 Stress

Apr 29, 2020

“After a brief initial period of alarm, we build up a strong resistance to stress — but that expires after such a long time. Then we enter an exhaustion phase where our ability to respond well has simply run out.” — Dr. Regina Ybarra, associate professor of instruction at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences.


Phys.org

Researchers’ Method Holds Promise for Brain Study, Better Tests for Viruses

Apr 27, 2020

“The system developed by researchers in the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science and the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences packages molecules inside microscopic gold-coated capsules, or nanovesicles, that can be very sensitive to near-infrared light.”


Medical Press

Researchers’ Analysis Confirms Effects of Cognitive Training for Older Adults

Apr 20, 2020

“One key finding was that cognitive training was found to significantly improve everyday functioning in older adults, which in turn can provide additional years of independence and potentially delay the onset of dementia.” — Dr. Chandramallika Basak, assistant professor of psychology at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences’ Center for Vital Longevity.


UT Dallas Office of Research

Social Disability for Autistic Adults is Not an Individual Trait

Apr 2, 2020

UT Dallas researchers are demonstrating that social disability for autistic adults is not an individual trait but varies depending on aspects of the social environment.


UT Dallas Office of Research

Cannabis and the Brain with Dr. Francesca Filbey

Mar 30, 2020

“The problem that I’ve identified is that very little work has been done in terms of how cannabis affects the brain. It’s been used by humans for centuries but up until now we really still don’t know what the effects are on the brain.” — Dr. Francesca Filbey, professor in the Department of Neuroscience, Bert Moore Chair in BrainHealth and director of cognitive neuroscience of addictive behaviors at the Center for BrainHealth.


Katy Trail Weekly

Callier Center For Communication Disorders

Mar 19, 2020

“Callier is unique. It is one of a select few centers for communication disorders in the nation that combine clinical care, graduate student training and research into one institution. Patients are served in our original location in Dallas and at our location on the UT Dallas campus in Richardson.” — Thomas Campbell, professor, Ludwig A. Michael, MD, Executive Director of the Callier Center for Communication Disorders.


UT Dallas Office of Research

Chronic Pain Is Affecting One-Third of the Population

Mar 10, 2020

Chronic pain affects one-third of the population. About 10 percent of the population suffers from high impact chronic pain which often causes disability and impacts their quality of life.


Scientific American

Autistic People Make Great Social Partners if You Actually Give Them a Chance

Mar 9, 2020

In one study, Dr. Noah Sasson, associate professor at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, and colleagues found that even within a couple seconds typically developing people make quick judgments about people on the autism spectrum. These patterns are robust, happen quickly, and persist across child and adult age groups. Unfortunately, these judgments are not favorable or kind.


News Medical

TB Bacteria Produce Fatty Acid that Triggers a Pain-Response Cough to Spread the Disease

Mar 7, 2020

“No one had ever shown that TB produces an irritant that acts directly on the sensory innervation of the lungs. We have now shown this directly through our collaborative work on this project.” — Dr. Theodore Price, professor of neuroscience at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences.


KERA News

Dallas Arboretum Adds Technology For Visitors With Hearing Loss, Just In Time For Spring

Mar 2, 2020

The Dallas Arboretum’s Spring festival ‘Dallas Blooms’ opened over the weekend. This year, the garden hopes to make the event more accessible to visitors with hearing loss by debuting new technology.


PBS Newshour

The ‘Speechless: Different by Design’ Exhibit Uses Brain Science to Inform Art

Feb 18, 2020

“I was excited by the possibility, because we don’t often have these opportunities to have a science-meets-art kind of conversation. And I have long thought that especially visual arts has a very clear link within the brain. And when you’re a neuroscientist, you tend to always think, how does the brain become active in different ways?” — Dr. Daniel Krawczyk, Debbie and Jim Francis Chair and professor of cognitive neuroscience and cognitive psychology at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences’ Center for BrainHealth.


My Sweet Charity

2020 Crystal Charity Ball Beneficiaries And A Record-Breaking Goal Of $7.87M Announced

Feb 10, 2020

Funding from the Crystal Charity Ball in the amount of $997,996 will support the Callier center for Communication Disorders Pediatric Special Connections Project.


The Mercury

Cybersecurity Masters Degree to be Offered Fall 2020

Feb 9, 2020

The new master’s degree program in Cybersecurity, housed in EPPS, with have courses from the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences and three other UT Dallas schools.


The Mercury

Nerve Stimulation Device Aids Rehabilitation after Stroke

Jan 26, 2020

“This study tells us that if we use this approach on complicated motor skills, those improvements can filter down to improve simpler movements.” — Dr. Michael Kilgard, Margaret Fonde Jonsson Chair and professor of neuroscience.


Popular Science

Hidden Hearing Loss is Hitting People of All Ages. Neuroscientists are Still Debating Why

Jan 21, 2020

She asked adults in their 20s to keep track of the time and volume when they went to a loud place, and she measured their hearing and speech-recognition abilities before and after. In participants who opted for a lot of high-decibel fun, she found no indication that they experienced any permanent changes. — Dr. Colleen Le Prell, the Emilie and Phil Schepps Professor of Hearing Science and professor and head of the Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing.


Science Blog

Scientists Target Link Between Chronic Pain, Cognitive Impairments

Jan 20, 2020

“Patients often report that even though their pain is being alleviated, the associated cognitive issues aren’t going away. For that signal to go away completely, we have to fix the underlying issue.” — Dr. Theodore Price, professor of neuroscience at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences.


Dallas Innovates

Discovery: UTD Device Improves Stroke Recovery; UTSW Team Tackles Kidney Cancer

Jan 17, 2020

Work being done by bioengineering researchers at the University of Texas at Dallas could enhance recovery for stroke patients. “This is one of the first human-grade implants designed, developed and manufactured at a university.” — Dr. Robert Rennaker, professor at the School of Behavorial and Brain Sciences.

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